Black church leaders spread information about COVID-19 vaccines

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PEOPLE’S HOMES TO PERSUADE PEOPLE TO GET VACCINE BUT IT IS PROVING TO BE A TOUGH SELL. >> MAKING SURE EVERYONE IN BALTIMEOR, ESPECIALLY IN LOW-INCOME COMMUNITIES, GET THE VACCINANE D INFORMATION THAT IS NECESSARY TO DO SO. >> THE CHURCH LEADERS FOR THE NATIONAL BLACK CHURCH INITIATIVE GAVE THEIR REMARKS AT A PARK IN DOUGLAS HOMES. THEY PASS AT A NEWSPAPER CALLED BACK NS,EW WHICH ANSWERED QUESTIONS ABOUT COVID, HOW IT SPREADS, AND HOW THE VCIACNE CAN PR OTECT PEOPLE. IT ALSO SAID BLACK DOCTORS SAY COVID-19 VACCINES ARE GOOD AND SAFE FOR BLACK PEOPLE. >> AS WE PLEAD WITH ALL OF THOSE WHO ARE UNVACCINATED GIVEN THE DEADLY STRAIN OF THE DELTA VARIANT PLEASE IN THE NA OFME CHRIST, SOMEBODY SAY AMEN, GET VACCINATED IMMEDIATELY >> AN IMPORTANT MESSAGE BUT IT WAS MOED ACKND DISMISSED BY SOME HERE. >> TO ACTUALLY TODAY COME IN THE HOOD AND TO SEE SO MANY FOLK NOT MASKED, NOT KEEPING DISTANCE MUCH LESS CONSIDERING THE VACCINE ‘I’S SORT OF FRUSTRATING BUT YOU GOTTA TO SRTTA SOMEWHE.ER >> DIA BNEENNETT, WHO IS VACCINATED SAYS IT FRUSTRATES HER TOO. SHE DID IT BECAUSE OF HER JOB. BENNETT HOPES PEOPLE IN HER COMMUNITY COME TO THEIR SENSES AND GET THE VACCINE. >> I DON’T THINK ANYONE UNDERSTANDS WHAT IT IS. WEAD H PEOPLE THAT HELPED US DO IT. WE WTEN IN A TENT. THEY BASICALLY HELP US DO IT STEP-BY-ST.EP WE CLDOU UNDERSTAND WHAT IS GOING ON. SO MAYBE THAT IS WHAT THEY NEED.

Black, Latino church leaders spread information about vaccines; some dismiss efforts


Leaders in Baltimore are doing everything they can to get more people vaccinated. The National Black Church Initiative, a coalition of 150,000 African American and Latino churches, attempted to get the word out on Friday at Douglas Homes to try to persuade people to get vaccinated, but it was proving to be a tough sell.”Making sure that everyone in Baltimore, especially low-income communities, get the vaccine and information that is necessary to do so,” National Black Church Initiative President Rev. Anthony Evans said.The church leaders from the National Black Church Initiative gave their remarks at a park in Douglas Homes. They passed out a newspaper they put together called “VaccNews,” which answered questions about COVID-19, how it spreads and how the vaccine can protect people. It also said that Black doctors say COVID-19 vaccines are good and safe for Black people.”We plead with all of those who are unvaccinated, given the deadly strain of the delta variant, please, in the name of Christ, somebody say amen, get vaccinated immediately,” Evans said.It’s an important message, but it was mocked and dismissed by some in the neighborhood.”To actually today come in the hood and to see so many folk not masked, not keeping distance, much less considering the vaccine, it’s sort of frustrating but you got to start somewhere,” Rev. Mark McCleary, of Liberty Seventh-day Adventist Church, said.Diane Bennett, who is vaccinated, said it frustrates her too. She did it because of her job and hopes people in her community come to their senses and get the vaccine.”I don’t think everybody understands what it is. We had people there to help us through it — we were in a tent so they basically helped us through it step-by-step so we could understand what’s going on, so maybe that’s what they need,” Bennett said.

Leaders in Baltimore are doing everything they can to get more people vaccinated.

The National Black Church Initiative, a coalition of 150,000 African American and Latino churches, attempted to get the word out on Friday at Douglas Homes to try to persuade people to get vaccinated, but it was proving to be a tough sell.

“Making sure that everyone in Baltimore, especially low-income communities, get the vaccine and information that is necessary to do so,” National Black Church Initiative President Rev. Anthony Evans said.

The church leaders from the National Black Church Initiative gave their remarks at a park in Douglas Homes. They passed out a newspaper they put together called “VaccNews,” which answered questions about COVID-19, how it spreads and how the vaccine can protect people. It also said that Black doctors say COVID-19 vaccines are good and safe for Black people.

“We plead with all of those who are unvaccinated, given the deadly strain of the delta variant, please, in the name of Christ, somebody say amen, get vaccinated immediately,” Evans said.

It’s an important message, but it was mocked and dismissed by some in the neighborhood.

“To actually today come in the hood and to see so many folk not masked, not keeping distance, much less considering the vaccine, it’s sort of frustrating but you got to start somewhere,” Rev. Mark McCleary, of Liberty Seventh-day Adventist Church, said.

Diane Bennett, who is vaccinated, said it frustrates her too. She did it because of her job and hopes people in her community come to their senses and get the vaccine.

“I don’t think everybody understands what it is. We had people there to help us through it — we were in a tent so they basically helped us through it step-by-step so we could understand what’s going on, so maybe that’s what they need,” Bennett said.

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